Last edited by Mazular
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Chivalry, Knighthood & War in the Middle Ages found in the catalog.

Chivalry, Knighthood & War in the Middle Ages

by Susan Ridyard

  • 110 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Univ of the South Pr .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History: World

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11441212M
    ISBN 100918769469
    ISBN 109780918769466

      This book, written by the French knight during the Hundred Years' War, covers what it was to be chivalrous at the time, and elaborates on the beliefs of a knight of the era. The reality is that the Hundred Years' War was not a time of knights in shining armor doing great by: 8.   Geoffroi de Charny (c. / 19 September ), first name sometimes spelled Geoffroy, was a French knight and author of at least three works on chivalry. He was born around His father, Jean de Charny was the Lord of Lirey in Burgundy and his mother was Margaret de Joinville (d. ), a daughter of Jean de Joinville, biographer of /5.

    If I expected this book to definitively explain the concept of knighthood in the Middle Ages, wow, was I wrong! It's a translation of a German work, for one thing, so it's really more specifically about the concept of knighthood in the Germanic world in the Middle Ages, arguing from the meaning of various technical terms in early Germanic dialects.3/5. This book is a collection of Maurice Keen's articles and deals with both the ideas of chivalry and the reality of warfare. He discusses brotherhood-in-arms, courtly love, crusades, heraldry, knighthood, the law of arms, tournaments and the nature of nobility, as well as describing the actual brutality of medieval warfare and the lure of plunder.2/5(1).

      Credit to Stephen Sims, Baylor University. Geoffroi de Charny () was a French knight who wrote at least three books on chivalry. Coming from an illustrious family of French knights, he served King Jean II and provided the theoretical foundation the Order of the Star, meant to improve the combat reputation of French knights after the disaster of Crecy in In modern English, chivalry means the ideals, virtues, or characteristics of knights. The phrases "orders of chivalry" and "orders of knighthood" are essentially synonymous. The German translation for "knight" is Ritter (literally, rider). The Latin term in the Middle Ages was miles, since a.


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Chivalry, Knighthood & War in the Middle Ages by Susan Ridyard Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chivalry, Knighthood & War in the Middle Ages Paperback – March 1, by Susan Ridyard (Editor)Format: Paperback. One of the most famous French knights of his age, Charny’s Book of Chivalry was written in an age when his country was facing political crisis and defeat.

In response to Chivalry problems, King Jean II founded the Order of the Star, for which the Book was written, in the hope that by returning to the chivalric ideals of loyalty and prowess, honour and victory could be by: 8.

Medieval knighthood and chivalry still hold a fascination for modern readers more than years after the knight's office was overtaken by the military officer and civil servant.

Writing in the latter part of the 13th century, Ramon Lull penned what has become on of the most influential books on what it meant to be a by: 4. The Chivalry series follows young William Gold, who runs away from London to follow the Black Prince, from the killing fields of France, through life as a routier and criminal, and to redemption with the Knights of Saint John, further disillusion and an eventual career as a professional soldier and knight.

Rich in the details of life in the High Middle Ages, The Chivalry series also deals with modern issues. Craig Taylor's study examines the wide-ranging French debates on the martial ideals of chivalry and knighthood during the period of the Hundred Years War ().

Faced by stunning military disasters and the collapse of public order, writers and intellectuals carefully scrutinized the martial qualities expected of knights and soldiers.5/5(1). Medieval Knights - Knighthood and the Code of Chivalry: A knight was expected to have not only the strength and skills to face combat in the violent era of the Middle Ages but was also expected to temper this aggressive side with a chivalrous side to his nature.

Chivalry and the Ideals of Knighthood in France during the Hundred Years War Craig Taylor’s book examines the wide-ranging French debates on the martial ideals of chivalry and knighthood during the period of the Hundred Years War (–).

Faced by stunning military disasters and the collapse of public order, writers and intellectuals. But their war experiences could leave them with a very serious case of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the researcher.

During his studies of violence in the Middle Ages he came across a book written by a knight who lived in the first half of the 14th century.

In the book, Chivalry, the late historian Maurice Hugh Keen argued that chivalric codes had served as a kind of international law of war that protected these knights as an aristocratic : Becky Little.

A significant work on the life and times of William Marshal, as well as a study of it's main source, L'Histoire de Guillaume de Marechal, presented in an accessible and readable style. The book is packed with facts and detailed information, much more than the number of pages would suggest, as well as an excellent bibliography and copious amounts of notes/5.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: iii, pages ; 22 cm. Contents: Aspects of knighthood: the knight and his horse ; Aspects of knighthood: knights and monks / Marjoie Chibnall --Classical antiquity in Chaucer's chivalric romances ; Malory, Tennyson, and Elaine of Astolat / A.C.

Spearing --Losing one's character: heralds and the decline of English knighthood. Chivalry, or the chivalric code, is a code of conduct associated with the medieval institution of knighthood which developed between and The ideals of chivalry were popularized in medieval literature, especially the Matter of Britain and Matter of France, the former based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae which introduced the legend of King Arthur, written in the s.

Knights in the Middle Ages were heavily-armed and prone to violence. In the 21st century, the word chivalry evokes a kind of old-fashioned male respect for.

Composed at the height of the Hundred Years War by Geoffroi de Charny, one of the most respected knights of his age, A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry was designed as a guide for members of the Company of the Star, an order created by Jean II of France /5(23).

Late Middle Ages. Chivalry underwent a revival and elaboration of chivalric ceremonial and rules of etiquette in the 14th century that was examined by Johan Huizinga, in The Waning of the Middle Ages, in which he dedicates a full chapter to "The idea of chivalry".

In contrasting the literary standards of chivalry with the actual warfare of the age, the historian finds the imitation of an ideal past illusory; in an. An example of warrior chivalry in the Middle Ages was Sir Gawain in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnelle.

Though it is called warrior chivalry, over half of the entries in the Knights codes of Chivalry relate to. Knighthood in the Middle Ages by Simon Newman Knighthood in the middle ages was something of a prestigious position.

The knight was charged with the obligation of learning the art of war and adhering to the code of chivalry. Cambridge Core - European Literature - Chivalry and the Ideals of Knighthood in France during the Hundred Years War - by Craig TaylorCited by: It was this violence that the church attempted to regulate, giving rise to a code meant for those horse-bound "knights" which later became known as chivalry.

Saul's book picks up this narrative with the Duke of Normandy William the Bastard's invasion and subjugation of England in Chivalry, the knightly class of feudal times. The primary sense of the term in Europe in the Middle Ages is ‘knights,’ or ‘fully armed and mounted fighting men.’ Thence the term came to mean the gallantry and honour expected of knights.

Later the word came to be used in its general sense of ‘courtesy.’. A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry Geoffroi de Charny. Introduction by Richard W. Kaeuper. Translation by Elspeth Kennedy. pages | 6 x 9 Paper | ISBN | $s | Outside the Americas £ Ebook editions are available from selected online vendors A volume in the Middle Ages Series "Of exceptional interest for the light shed on the ethos, style, and tastes of the secular.Knights Code of Chivalry.

More often than not, Chivalry was associated with knighthood. The Code of Chivalry was the code of conduct followed by the knights during the medieval period. It was developed between the 11th and 12th century. However, according to David Crouch, a British Medieval historian, the Code of Chivalry was dated back the ancient times.

Geoffroi de Charny (trans. R.W. Kaeuper and E. Kennedy), A Knight’s Own Book of Chivalry: Geoffroi de Charny (University of Pennsylvania Press, ) D. Crouch, William Marshal: Knighthood, War.